Parution – “African American Education”, History of Education Quarterly, Volume 61 – Special Issue 1 – February 2021


https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/history-of-education-quarterly/issue/492673E793C524D1034B6E13DF9DCC23

Constancy and Change: An Editorial Introduction

A.J. Angulo and Jack Schneider

Special Issue on African American Education

Articles

Determination and Persistence: Building the African American Teacher Corps through Summer and Intermittent Teaching, 1860s–1890s

Michael Fultz

“Hell Is Popping Here in South Carolina”: Orangeburg County Black Teachers and Their Community in the Immediate Post-Brown Era

Candace Cunningham

Not Just the Raising of Money: Hampton Institute and Relationship Fundraising, 1893–1917

Troy A. Smith

Parution – Walter C. Stern, “Race and Education in New Orleans: Creating the Segregated City, 1764–1960”, Louisiana Sate UP, 2018

Surveying the two centuries that preceded Jim Crow’s demise, Race and Education in New Orleans traces the course of the city’s education system from the colonial period to the start of school desegregation in 1960. Walter C. Stern’s timely historical analysis reveals that public schools in New Orleans both suffered from and maintained the racial stratification that characterized urban areas for much of the twentieth century.

By taking a long view of the interplay between education, race, and urban change, Stern underscores the fluidity of race as a social construct and the extent to which the Jim Crow system evolved through a dynamic though often improvisational process.

Parution – Camille Walsh, “Racial Taxation. Schools, Segregation, and Taxpayer Citizenship, 1869–1973”, University of North Carolina Press, 2018

In the United States, it is quite common to lay claim to the benefits of society by appealing to “taxpayer citizenship”–the idea that, as taxpayers, we deserve access to certain social services like a public education. Tracing the genealogy of this concept, Camille Walsh shows how tax policy and taxpayer identity were built on the foundations of white supremacy and intertwined with ideas of whiteness. From the origins of unequal public school funding after the Civil War through school desegregation cases from Brown v. Board of Education to San Antonio v. Rodriguez in the 1970s, this study spans over a century of racial injustice, dramatic courtroom clashes, and white supremacist backlash to collective justice claims.

Incorporating letters from everyday individuals as well as the private notes of Supreme Court justices as they deliberated, Walsh reveals how the idea of a “taxpayer” identity contributed to the contemporary crises of public education, racial disparity, and income inequality.

Parution – Sandra Neil Wallace et Rich Wallace, “The Teachers March! How Selma’s Teachers Changed History”

Reverend F.D. Reese was a leader of the Voting Rights Movement in Selma, Alabama, but he needed a “triumphant idea” to ignite the campaign. As a teacher he recognized that his colleagues were viewed with great respect in the city. Could he convince them to risk their jobs, and perhaps their lives, by organizing a teachers’ march to the county courthouse to demand their right to vote? On January 22, 1965, 105 African-American teachers did just that, with Reverend Reese leading the way. In this extraordinary true story of bravery and perseverance, the authors highlight the critical moment when the teachers took action and gave thousands more the courage to march, leading to the passing of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. As part of their research, the Wallaces interviewed teachers and students involved in this little-known, pivotal civil rights event and conducted the last interviews with Reverend Reese before his recent death.

Sélection de plus de 300 articles parus en histoire de l’éducation pendant l’année 2020 (revue mondiale)

Compilation de la veille faite chaque mois sur H-Education par Rick Mikulski, MLS, PhD, Assistant Professor & Librarian à la Portland State University

Janvier 2020

  • Arnaldo Briskievicz, Danilo. “A educação no Brasil colonial a partir do Serro/MG (1702 a 1758). [Education in Serro/MG, colonial Brazil (1702-1758).]” Espacio, Tiempo y Educación, Vol. 7 Issue 1, p205-225.
  • D’ALESSIO, Michela. “The «New School» of Basilicata in Mid-twentieth Century. Arturo Arcomano’s Contribution for a Different Education in Southern Italy.” Espacio, Tiempo y Educación, v. 7, n. 1, p. 47-67.
  • DALLABRIDA, Norberto. “The Experimental Classes: Different Secondary Education in Brazil in 1950s and 1960s.” Espacio, Tiempo y Educación, v. 7, n. 1, p. 133-146.
  • D’Ascenzo, Mirella. “Pedagogic Alternatives in Italy after the Second World War: the Experience of the Movimento di Cooperazione Educativa and Bruno Ciari’s New School in Bologna.” Espacio, Tiempo y Educación, 2020, Vol. 7 Issue 1, p69-87.
  • GROVES, Tamar. “Professional Advocacy in Education. The Legacy of the 1960s Students’ Protest and the Forging of a Social-Professional Identity among Teachers (Spain, 1970-1982).” Espacio, Tiempo y Educación. v. 7, n. 1, p. 163-180, jan. 2020.
  • Lowe, Roy. “The charitable status of elite schools: the origins of a national scandal” History of Education, January 2020, Vol.49(1), pp.4-17.
  • MACHADO TRUJILLO, Cristian. “The Technological Boom in Schools in the 80s: an Approximation to the Spanish ATENEA Programme.” Espacio, Tiempo y Educación, v. 7, n. 1, p. 247-262, jan. 2020.
  • MANGAL, Aarti. “A century of teacher education in India: 1883-1985.” Espacio, Tiempo y Educación, v. 7, n. 1, p. 263-285, jan. 2020.
  • McCormack, Christopher F. “Society, science and institutionally-embodied higher education reform in nineteenth-century Ireland: the role of mobile, professional elites in fashioning reform.” History of Education; Jan2020, Vol. 49 Issue 1, p18-37.
  • Meşeci Giorgetti, Filiz. “Nation-building in Turkey through ritual pedagogy: the late Ottoman and early Turkish Republican era.” History of Education; Jan2020, Vol. 49 Issue 1, p77-103.
  • ROBERT, André D; JEAN-YVES, Seguy. “The French Classes Nouvelles (1945-1952): Why is it so Difficult to Change Traditional Pedagogy?” Espacio, Tiempo y Educación, v. 7, n. 1, p. 27-45, jan. 2020.    
  • Rosnes, Ellen Vea. “A time of destiny for Norwegian mission schools in Zululand and Natal under the policy of Bantu Education (1948–1955).” History of Education; Jan2020, Vol. 49 Issue 1, p104-125.
  • VISACOVSKY, Nerina. “Between State and Private Education: the Ideological Dilemma of Argentine Progressive Jews (1955-1995).” Espacio, Tiempo y Educación, [S.l.], v. 7, n. 1, p. 287-313, jan. 2020.
Continuer la lecture de « Sélection de plus de 300 articles parus en histoire de l’éducation pendant l’année 2020 (revue mondiale) »

Publication – Kabria Baumgartner, “In Pursuit of Knowledge. Black Women and Educational Activism in Antebellum America”, New-York UP, 2019.

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story’s origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles—from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm’s way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights—not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.

Publication – Carl Suddler, “Presumed Criminal. Black Youth and the Justice System in Postwar New York”, New-York UP, 2019.

A stark disparity exists between black and white youth experiences in the justice system today. Black youths are perceived to be older and less innocent than their white peers. When it comes to incarceration, race trumps class, and even as black youths articulate their own experiences with carceral authorities, many Americans remain surprised by the inequalities they continue to endure. In this revealing book, Carl Suddler brings to light a much longer history of the policies and strategies that tethered the lives of black youths to the justice system indefinitely.

The criminalization of black youth is inseparable from its racialized origins. In the mid-twentieth century, the United States justice system began to focus on punishment, rather than rehabilitation. By the time the federal government began to address the issue of juvenile delinquency, the juvenile justice system shifted its priorities from saving delinquent youth to purely controlling crime, and black teens bore the brunt of the transition.

In New York City, increased state surveillance of predominantly black communities compounded arrest rates during the post–World War II period, providing justification for tough-on-crime policies. Questionable police practices, like stop-and-frisk, combined with media sensationalism, cemented the belief that black youth were the primary cause for concern. Even before the War on Crime, the stakes were clear: race would continue to be the crucial determinant in American notions of crime and delinquency, and black youths condemned with a stigma of criminality would continue to confront the overwhelming power of the state.

Publication – Joshua M. Myers, “We Are Worth Fighting For. A History of the Howard University Student Protest of 1989”, New-York UP, 2019

We Are Worth Fighting For is the first history of the 1989 Howard University protest. The three-day occupation of the university’s Administration Building was a continuation of the student movements of the sixties and a unique challenge to the politics of the eighties. Upset at the university’s appointment of the Republican strategist Lee Atwater to the Board of Trustees, students forced the issue by shutting down the operations of the university. The protest, inspired in part by the emergence of “conscious” hip hop, helped to build support for the idea of student governance and drew upon a resurgent black nationalist ethos.

At the center of this story is a student organization known as Black Nia F.O.R.C.E. Co-founded by Ras Baraka, the group was at the forefront of organizing the student mobilization at Howard during the spring of 1989 and thereafter. We Are Worth Fighting For explores how black student activists—young men and women— helped shape and resist the rightward shift and neoliberal foundations of American politics. This history adds to the literature on Black campus activism, Black Power studies, and the emerging histories of African American life in the 1980s.

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search